N.H. Court Orders Home-Schooled Girl into Public School
faxless payday loans

Posted by Howard Rich | Issues
faxless payday loans
, News
faxless payday loans
, School Choice
faxless payday loans
| Monday 31 August 2009 4:45 PM

From The Citizen Link

faxless payday loans


ADF asks judge to reconsider her over-reaching decision.

The Alliance Defense Fund (ADF) has asked a New Hampshire court to reconsider its decision to order a 10-year-old home-schooled girl into public school.

“Parents have a fundamental right to make educational choices for their children,” said ADF-allied attorney John Anthony Simmons. “In this case, the court is illegitimately altering a method of education that the court itself admits is working.”

The parents of the girl are divorced, and the mother has been home-schooling her. In the process of renegotiating the terms of a parenting plan for the girl, the guardian ad litem concluded that the girl “appeared to reflect her mother’s rigidity on questions of faith” and that the girl’s interests “would be best served by exposure to a public school setting.”

Judge Lucinda V. Sadler approved the recommendation and issued the order July 14.

“The New Hampshire Supreme Court itself has specifically declared, ‘Home education is an enduring American tradition and right,’ ” said ADF Senior Legal Counsel Mike Johnson. “There is clearly and without question no legitimate legal basis for the court’s decision, and we trust it will reconsider its conclusions.”

Mike Donnelly, staff attorney at the Home School Legal Defense Association, agreed this is “not the place for the courts to be inserting themselves.”

Term Limits Benefit All
faxless payday loans

Posted by Howard Rich | Issues
faxless payday loans
, News
faxless payday loans
, Term Limits
faxless payday loans
| Monday 31 August 2009 2:33 PM

A letter to the editor of the Dallas Morning News

faxless payday loans


Re: "We have a way to fix Congress," by Bob Kirby, Wednesday Letters.

faxless payday loans

Kirby spoke against term limits for Congress, saying that we already have voting as a method to fix Congress. I have to take exception with his conclusion.

I can only vote for the person running in my district. The other congressional representatives have as much or more influence on things that affect me — but I can’t vote them out. They vote their party line or the desires of lobbyists rather than considering their constituents. Only term limits ensure that members of Congress will be replaced on a regular basis. We desperately need representatives who are not professional office holders.

Almost all of the various districts have been gerrymandered to ensure that one party or the other will win that seat. It is well known that once someone gets voted into office, he most likely will continue to be re-elected.

Ronald Parker Plano, Tx.

Interior Secretary defends Obama's energy policies
faxless payday loans

Posted by Howard Rich | News
faxless payday loans
| Friday 28 August 2009 4:45 PM

From BusinessWeek.com

faxless payday loans

President Barack Obama wants a climate change bill that addresses his top priorities: energy independence, job creation and preventing pollution, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said Thursday.

Salazar joined Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter, Democratic Rep. Betsy Markey and Nancy Sutley, chairwoman of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, at a forum to talk about President Barack Obama’s clean-energy policies.

The Clean Energy Economy Forum in Fort Collins was one of the first to promote Obama’s vision for a comprehensive energy plan to jump-start the American clean energy sector.

“President Obama’s vision is that we need to address all of these issues. How we do that is the art of what’s possible in Congress. This is an issue where the very future of our children and planet are hanging in peril. Our goal is to get energy and climate change legislation that is workable,” Salazar said.

He said the administration doesn’t want to pick and choose over issues like carbon pollution.

The climate change bill, which narrowly passed the House earlier this summer, imposes the first limits on greenhouse gases. It eventually would lead to an 80 percent reduction by putting a price on each ton of climate-altering pollution.

However, the Democratic-controlled House approved the bill by a slim margin, and Senate Democrats say changes will be necessary to clear that chamber.

Salazar didn’t say exactly what administration officials want to see kept or changed in the House bill. But the former Democratic senator said the president is committed to getting it done.

Boulder County Commissioner Will Toor said the federal government needs to eliminate some of the barriers to developing renewable energy. He said the federal government needs to approve bonding that would allow lower interest rates and set up a federal loan program.

Toor said better financing would help move renewable energy from pilot projects “to a tool that is potentially a game changer.”

Sutley said climate change is “one of the big issues of our time” and renewable energy is a major part of the solution. She said the United States is now spending billions of dollars on research and development.

“The next step is to make sure America leads,” she said.

D.C. Mayor puts kids in public school and gets school choice at the same time
faxless payday loans

Posted by Howard Rich | Issues
faxless payday loans
, News
faxless payday loans
, School Choice
faxless payday loans
| Friday 28 August 2009 3:10 PM

from DC Charter Schools Examiner

faxless payday loans


When D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty took over DCPS a couple of years ago he promised to move his two sons from private to public school. Turns out he stuck to his word although it proved difficult for the press to obtain this information. The reason? Mr. Fenty did what all arrogant politicians do and put his children not in the neighborhood school, West Elementary, at 14th and Farragut Streets that has failed to make AYP for a couple of years, but instead enrolled them at a much better institution, Lafayette Elementary, which is located in Chevy Chase, and whose students score over 90 percent proficient or above in both reading and math.

Of course all parents want to do what’s best for their children. But what is driving me mad is that he and President Obama are so dead set against giving this chance to everyone else. Mr. Fenty is silently watchings as Congress moves to kill the Opportunity Scholarship Program and he refused to stand up to U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan and the President when they pulled back from 216 kids their admission to private schools under the voucher plan.

This country is beginning to look a lot like the old Soviet Union when regular citizens were starving on the streets but the dictators were living the lives of kings. This attitude is reflected in the health care debate. At the town hall meetings politicians have been repeatedly asked whether if there is a public option they will have to join the plan. Their response, "Congress has its own insurance coverage."

You think I’m exaggerating? Well today the editors of the Washington Post again call on the President to renew the Opportunity Scholarship Program, not only due to a recent study that concluded that "the D.C. voucher program has proven to be the most effective education policy evaluated by the federal government’s official education research arm so far," but because sending kids to public schools may result in their death.

The editors quote a new study by the Heritage and Lexington Institutes which shows that for the 2007 – 2008 term in the 70 public schools that the 216 students who were denied scholarships are assigned to there were 2,379 crime related incidents, with 666 of these categorized as violent and one classified as a homicide.

In a situation like this a parent must do whenever they can to move their child from the neighborhood school. But for Mr. Obama and Fenty what is good or them is not O.K. for everyone else.

Murtha challenger hosts health care forum
faxless payday loans

Posted by Howard Rich | Issues
faxless payday loans
, News
faxless payday loans
, Term Limits
faxless payday loans
| Friday 28 August 2009 11:44 AM

From Our Town Online

faxless payday loans


JOHNSTOWN — The debate on health care reform brought out more than 110 people on Thursday, many of them participating in a question-and-answer session hosted by a Republican challenger to U.S. Rep. John Murtha.

Tim Burns, a Washington County businessman who grew up in Johnstown, recorded the session and promised to send the video to Murtha.

“We want to hear from you on what your concerns are and what your ideas are in terms of health care reform, which I think is a key topic,” said Burns’ spokesman, Kent Gates to the crowd before the forum.

The crowd, which was civil despite some obvious strong feelings, spent much of the hour voicing concerns about not only health care reform but about the government in general.

“They’re supposed to be working for and they’ve forgotten that,” Tammy Hockycko of Davidsville said of elected officials.

Burns told the crowd that if elected, he would focus on changing the current system to better suit the needs of the insured. “There are no doubt problems with the health care system” he said.

Making insurance companies more competitive by relaxing controls that keep them from operating in multiple states would be one way. “Right now they have regional monopolies,” he said.

It was clear that many in the crowd wanted sweeping changes that included term limits and actions to limit illegal immigration. Some thought the government should tackle tort reform before health care reform.

Terry Anderson of Indiana asked Burns if he supported closing the border, enacting tort reform and setting term limits as part of his candidacy for the 12th Congressional District seat.

His questions — to which Burns said yes to all three — were met with a large round of applause from the crowd.

While the forum, held in the Masonic Temple, served mainly as a political rally, several people in the crowd came forward as medical experts or small business owners with knowledge of the current health care system.

“From my standpoint, we are dealing with one-sixth of the American economy,” said Dr. J. Michael Moses. “We need to move slowly on this.”

The Johnstown surgeon did say change was necessary. “I believe that we need to have health care reform. But not at this time. We need to fix the economy first.”

Vickie Long, a Cambria County jury commissioner, urged the crowd to stay active in the political process as a way of having their voices heard. “Talk to people you know, just get people to vote,” she told the group.

Although he was invited expressly by Burns, Murtha did not attend the meeting. Representatives of the congressman said a telephone town hall on health care reform will be held on Sept. 3 for concerned constituents.

They said two previous telephonic town halls have reached over 15,000 people in the district.

(Dan DiPaolo can be contacted at dand@dailyamerican.com

faxless payday loans
. Comment on the story at dailyamerican.com
faxless payday loans
)

Francine Taylor: DA should stick to term limits
faxless payday loans

Posted by Howard Rich | Issues
faxless payday loans
, News
faxless payday loans
, Term Limits
faxless payday loans
| Thursday 27 August 2009 11:45 AM

From the Summit Daily News

faxless payday loans


I am not acquainted personally or professionally with the Mark Hurlbert, district attorney, but I am not persuaded that he should be allowed to escape the statutory term limits.

The fact that other states or counties have different limits on elected prosecutors is not a reason to void or ignore the current Colorado law. Different political subdivisions often have different statutes. Colorado voters adopted the term limits amendment, and regardless of whether you agree with it, that is the current law. According to the Colorado Supreme Court, it applies to the DA office.

But now Hurlbert states that term limits should not apply to him. He has cast it in altruistic terms: that due to office turn-over and efficiency he should be allowed to remain; in essence, that he is too valuable to be replaced, we can’t afford to lose him.

This ignores the fact that term limits are generally put in place because voters want to increase turn over and decrease incumbents’ power. The price of this may be some loss of efficiency, but every choice has a cost. And I believe that term limits were in effect when he ran for his office, so this is not a surprise to him.

If the voters agree with Mr. Hurlbert, and wish to revise the law, or re-elect him in the future, that’s fine. If enough voters agree he is essential, as he thinks he is, maybe we’ll do that. But for now, as an “officer of the court” he should follow the law and leave office.I am not acquainted personally or professionally with the Mark Hurlbert, district attorney, but I am not persuaded that he should be allowed to escape the statutory term limits.

The fact that other states or counties have different limits on elected prosecutors is not a reason to void or ignore the current Colorado law. Different political subdivisions often have different statutes. Colorado voters adopted the term limits amendment, and regardless of whether you agree with it, that is the current law. According to the Colorado Supreme Court, it applies to the DA office.

But now Hurlbert states that term limits should not apply to him. He has cast it in altruistic terms: that due to office turn-over and efficiency he should be allowed to remain; in essence, that he is too valuable to be replaced, we can’t afford to lose him.

This ignores the fact that term limits are generally put in place because voters want to increase turn over and decrease incumbents’ power. The price of this may be some loss of efficiency, but every choice has a cost. And I believe that term limits were in effect when he ran for his office, so this is not a surprise to him.

If the voters agree with Mr. Hurlbert, and wish to revise the law, or re-elect him in the future, that’s fine. If enough voters agree he is essential, as he thinks he is, maybe we’ll do that. But for now, as an “officer of the court” he should follow the law and leave office.

Englewood loses battle to take over private company’s light system
faxless payday loans

Posted by Howard Rich | Issues
faxless payday loans
, News
faxless payday loans
, Property Rights
faxless payday loans
| Thursday 27 August 2009 9:05 AM

From the Dayton Daily News

faxless payday loans

ENGLEWOOD — A divided state Supreme Court declined Wednesday, Aug. 26, to hear Englewood’s case that the street-lighting system owned by Miami Valley Lighting LLC should be declared a public utility.

The city wished to takeover the system, believing it could save taxpayers nearly $100,000 annually over what MVL, a wholly owned subsidiary of DPL Inc., charged.

A trial court judge, upheld in April by the 2nd District Court of Appeals, ruled MVL’s street lights are not a public utility. MVL provides street lighting systems throughout the Miami Valley. Had the city prevailed in its suit, the effect could have been millions of dollars in savings.

“We’ve taken it as far as we can,” Eric Smith, city manager, said. “The casket is closed. We’re going to bury this one.”

MVL asserted its property rights in opposition to the city’s takeover through eminent domain.

“We are pleased that three separate levels of judicial review have now affirmed that eminent domain cannot be used to take the assets of a private business,” said Lesley Sprigg, a DPL spokeswoman.

The city leases the lights from MVL for around $220,000 a year. A city analysis found it could run the system for $117,000 annually.

It was a case closely watched by municipalities throughout the Miami Valley and Ohio. If Englewood had been successful, other cities would likely have gone down the same path.

“Any prudent local government would look into it, especially in these economic times,” said John Weithofer, executive director of the Miami Valley Communications Council, which negotiates a number of contracts, including streetlights, for all or some of its eight member communities. There are 13 other affiliated communities that often adopt the negotiated contracts as their own.

Weithofer said earlier this year that the most recent four-year contract, which expires in 2010, costs the cities of Centerville, Germantown, Kettering, Miamisburg, Moraine, Oakwood and West Carrollton an estimated $5.7 million. He said a council survey found MVL’s price structure was higher than other Ohio utilities.

Smith said though the legal fight may be ended, the 2010 negotiations will benefit.

“The legal research we conducted will not go to waste. … It will be used in the future negotiations.”

MVL claimed its 1,212 street lights — about 80 percent of the lights in the Englewood — do not constitute a public utility. Nor is the system real property; it is MVL’s personal property that can be removed should the contract with the city lapse.

A city can appropriate real property through eminent domain, but not personal property.

The high court voted 5-2, with Chief Justice Thomas J. Moyer and Justice Paul E. Pfeifer dissenting, not to hear the appeal.

Term Limits Are Debated in Colombia
faxless payday loans

Posted by Howard Rich | Issues
faxless payday loans
, News
faxless payday loans
, Term Limits
faxless payday loans
| Wednesday 26 August 2009 4:45 PM

BOGOTÁ, Colombia (Agence France-Presse) — Legislators debated sharply on Tuesday about a referendum that would change the Constitution to allow President Álvaro Uribe to run for a third term.

The proposal is part of a trend among Latin American leaders who have sought to use referendums to undercut constitutional term limits and prolong their time in power.

Voters in Venezuela and Bolivia have approved the lifting of term limits to extend incumbents’ stays in office.

Efforts by President Manuel Zelaya of Honduras to remove term limits were the cause of a military coup in the Central American nation in June.

In Colombia in 2006, Mr. Uribe, a conservative, became the first president to be consecutively re-elected in more than a century after his political supporters gained approval of a constitutional amendment that removed an existing one-term limit for the presidency and created a two-term limit.

To achieve passage of the new referendum that would permit Mr. Uribe to run for a third term, his supporters would have to gain the backing of at least 84 lawmakers. Before the debate, Interior Minister Fabio Valencia said he was confident of at least 91 votes from the governing coalition.

If lawmakers approve the measure, it will then go to the constitutional court for review.

President Obama and the Roman Catholic Church have questioned Mr. Uribe’s bid for another term as president.

Mr. Uribe has said that he is not seeking to extend power, but that he simply wants to provide continuity for his administration’s crackdown on the leftist FARC guerrillas.

He has not yet said conclusively that he will run in the presidential election next year, if the term limit is altered.

The president remains popular, despite extrajudicial killings by the army and the wiretapping of rivals.

A Lesson from Across the Pond
faxless payday loans

Posted by Howard Rich | Columns
faxless payday loans
, News
faxless payday loans
| Wednesday 26 August 2009 11:45 AM

As states like California, Illinois and New Jersey struggle to make up for steep multi-billion dollar budget deficits while they totter on the brink of insolvency, there is one option for reducing those shortfalls that is making real headway across the Atlantic Ocean.

It all revolves around cutting the public sector. It’s time to try it here.

Ireland is faced with a €20 billion deficit and borrowing €400 million a week just to keep afloat. Colm McCarthy, the chairman of An Bord Snip Nua—a cost-cutting bureau in Ireland—knows the stakes. And he sees no way around cutting public sector pay by some €5.3 billion. Government officials agree. So far, the left-of-center government refuses to rule anything out in the Bord Snip report.

Writes The Sunday Times on July 19th, “Ireland is like a household that has been living beyond its means and now finds itself deep in hock to the bank. Unless we show a willingness to reduce our spending, [international] lending may dry up, forcing us into the arms of the European Central Bank which will have to mount an IMF-style rescue to prevent a euro currency crisis.”

Ireland is not alone. Poland just announced a cut of 12,000 government employees. No silly furloughs or dodgy accounting tricks. A straight reduction in the number of public sector workers. And the government warns that if revenues do not increase, further reductions will be forthcoming. Other nations in Europe are actively considering similar or even deeper cuts.

The basic problems Ireland faces are quite similar to those in California, New York and other states in the U.S.: Public sector workers make far more than their private sector counterpart.

An October 2007 survey from Ireland’s Central Statistics Office showed that the average hourly earnings in the public sector were far greater than in the private sector. Average earnings per hour in the public sector were €26.67 compared with €18.07 per hour in the private sector. Public sector wages are 48% higher.

And how do California, Illinois and others match up?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ recently published study for 2007, in California, which is still trying to climb out of its oppressive $26 billion deficit, average annual income for state employees was $56,777 versus $49,935 for the private sector, a 14 percent gap. In Illinois, a similar story emerges: $53,925 for state workers, and $48,006 for the private sector, an 11 percent split. New Jersey: $57,845 average state salary, $53,590 for private sector workers, at an 8 percent difference. And these differences don’t take into account the excessive fringe benefits enjoyed by public sector workers. The bottom-line is that we pay the public sector more, in some cases far more, than corresponding workers in private business.

Nationally, the story is even worse. Federal workers made on average $64,871 in 2007, with private sector workers making a meager $44,362, so public sector wages in the federal system are 46% higher.

If California, and other spendthrift state governments ever hope to emerge in the black, they must now implement what some may consider draconian fiscal measures. Cutting public sector pay makes the most sense. In California, for example, if workers received a 12.1 percent pay cut, leveling the playing field with the private sector, the state would save $3.1 billion.

Cutting the total workforce down by 10 percent is a real move that saves $5.4 billion annually and many billions more over time. Similar approaches would save taxpayers annually $1.3 billion in Illinois and New Jersey.

The fact is, the Irish are on to something. By facing the reality of their situation head-on and acting in a responsible manner, they are far more likely to weather the financial storm than are the compulsive spenders in the US. It is high time we embrace the pluck of the Irish here.

The author is Chairman of Americans for Limited Government and Liberty Features Syndicated writer

LA school board approves school choice plan
faxless payday loans

Posted by Howard Rich | Issues
faxless payday loans
, News
faxless payday loans
, School Choice
faxless payday loans
| Wednesday 26 August 2009 9:05 AM

From Chron.com

faxless payday loans


LOS ANGELES — The Los Angeles Board of Education voted Tuesday to adopt a controversial resolution that could turn a third of the schools in the nation’s second-largest school district over to private operators.

The proposal, which gives Superintendent Ramon Cortines 60 days to develop a plan, was approved 6-1 after a contentious four-hour public hearing and board debate.

Proposals will be accepted from private charter school operators, local communities and the mayor’s office for the operation of 50 new schools that will open over the next four years, as well as 200 existing schools that are chronic underperformers.

School board member Marguerite LaMotte cast the only dissenting vote.

“I haven’t seen any research-based study that says giving away schools improves academic achievement,” LaMotte said.

Other board members said in a district that has a 33 percent high school dropout rate, the time for radical change is past due.

“What is desperately needed is rapid, large scale student-centered reform,” said school board member Yoli Flores Aguilar, who introduced the resolution.

The LAUSD, which has more than 688,000 students, already boasts the highest number of charter schools of any school district in the country. About 150 of its 800 schools are run by nonprofit educational groups.

Until now, schools have been turned into charter operations largely through the efforts of parents and teachers on an ad hoc basis.

By inviting outsiders to submit proposals, the resolution gives the district more input over the selection of charters, implements more measures to monitor charter school performance and holds schools accountable for improving student achievement.

It also allows non-traditional groups to form partnerships with schools, following the lead of Chicago and New York school districts.

“This is increasing the diversity of educational providers,” said Priscilla Wohlstetter, director of University of Southern California’s Center for Educational Governance. “We don’t know who’s out there who would like to take over an underperforming school. It could be a museum, a medical provider, a social service agency.”

During the hearing, many parents spoke in favor of the school choice plan.

“It’s not acceptable. Our children deserve a better education. We cannot keep doing the same thing thinking we’ll get different results,” said Isabel Medina of East Los Angeles whose child attends Garfield High School, which has a 50 percent dropout rate.

The choice plan also drew the support of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce, the Valley Industry Commerce Association and the United Way of Greater Los Angeles.

School district unions opposed the plan, arguing that the district was giving away its schools.

“This is the beginning of the dismembering of L.A. Unified,” former school board member Jackie Goldberg said.

The resolution requires groups to maintain neighborhood demographics in their student bodies and to work with LAUSD unions. Teachers who work in charters are not covered by the district’s union, United Teachers Los Angeles.

“All the data says charter schools do not do better than public schools,” UTLA President A.J. Duffy said. “This is bureaucracy putting in a top-down plan which hasn’t worked before.”

The resolution also calls for the district to appoint a lead person to supervise the effort but seek foundation funding to pay for the employee’s salary.

Before the board voted, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa rallied a crowd of hundreds of parents and resolution in a bilingual chant of “We want change. We want choice. We’re going to win.”

Los Angeles mayors are not officials of the school district but Villaraigosa has pushed for charters at the so-called “mayor’s schools.”

A law that would have given him partial authority over the school system was knocked down in court in 2007. However, his nonprofit Partnership for Los Angeles Schools later won permission to manage seven schools with more than 30,000 students.

The 710-square-mile district serves Los Angeles, many neighboring cities and some unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County. It is governed by the elected Board of Education.

Next Page »
faxless payday loans
e-wallet Wordpress Theme